Centre Write
Centre Write
Like any big political coalition in a two party system, the Conservative Party is the natural home for many ideological strains. Yet, despite the party’s name, its small-c conservative thinkers who have been more or less absent without leave for some time – arguably since Mrs Thatcher’s second term of office, when her focus shifted from addressing existing problems (e.g. curbing union power, reducing the state’s involvement in business, reducing contributions to the EEC) to removing theoretical opportunity costs and…
The Ugandan People’s Defence Force (UPDF), the government armed forces of Uganda, face accusations of significant human rights violations. As one of the larger militaries in its region, the UPDF plays an important role in conflict resolution and peacekeeping in both Uganda, and the wider East African region. In recent years, the UPDF has been engaged in operations in Uganda, Somalia, and the Central African Republic. Operations in Uganda The UPDF has a long history of alleged human rights violations…
Judiciously leaked, a late draft of Labour’s manifesto appeared last week, which at least meant that, unlike the others, people would read it. The leak seemed to do no harm – policy discussion is Labour’s least bad arena, compared to the personal qualities of the leaders or the parties’ organisational skills. And policies there were aplenty. Cunningly –was this deliberate? – the manifesto was a little shorter than 1983’s, heading off jokes about the longest suicide note. Some reactions were…
In 2012 and 2014, Brazil enjoyed being under the international spotlight as it hosted both the FIFA World Cup and the Olympic Games. However, more recently, Brazil has attracted more unfavourable attention from human rights organisations, who have frequently accused Brazil of violating basic human rights laws, particularly in relation to its justice system. Thousands of people have allegedly been killed by police since 2015 while conditions in Brazil’s jails have been castigated for being inhumane and prison officers have…
Tuesday, 09 May 2017 01:00

Kieron O’Hara: The joys of opposing

The election campaign rumbles on, with the strong and stable™ Tories leading the poll. Incredibly, according to YouGov only 15% of people recognise the notorious Tory slogan. On the other hand, only 2% spontaneously mention Jeremy Corbyn’s Blairite riff off for the many and not for the few. Perhaps this is because, thanks to Mr Corbyn, the few now seem to outnumber the many. Nevertheless, the progressive forces (who are a very few people indeed) still want to join together…
Wednesday, 26 April 2017 08:54

Gabriel Gavin: One Nation under May

In Cumbria, they don’t count Labour votes – they weigh them. Or at least they did. Trudy Harrison’s victory in Copeland looks to be the first sign that there are no no-go areas for the Conservative Party any more. Labour support is being eroded by worries over what Jeremy Corbyn would mean for working people in traditional industries such as the nuclear industry at Sellafield and in the shipyards of Barrow and Furness. The next few months and years will…
Monday, 24 April 2017 15:39

Kieron O'Hara: Infernal doctrines?

Shortly after the 1885 General Election, the young Joseph Conrad wrote to a friend, bemoaning the result: Where’s the man to stop the rush of social-democratic ideas? The opportunity and the day have come and are gone! Believe me: gone for ever! For the sun is set and the last barrier removed. England was the only barrier to the pressure of infernal doctrines born in continental back-slums. Now, there is nothing! The destiny of this nation and of all nations…
Wednesday, 19 April 2017 10:00

Edmund Flett: Say yes to legalisation

In a sense it is misleading to refer to a ‘liberalisation’ of drugs policy. If anything, what is proposed is the complete opposite. Anyone who thinks otherwise will falter at the question: what could be less regulated than a black market? The illegal drug market has no checks for adulteration or purity; products do not come with information on dosage, usage, and risks. The trade is associated with untold human misery, inflicted by cartels and traffickers. Europol estimates the annual…
Thursday, 13 April 2017 12:00

Philip Collins: Establishment in transition

The term ‘the Establishment’ is sometimes attributed, probably apocryphally, to the radical historian AJP Taylor. In a review in 1953 of a biography of William Cobbett in The New Statesman, Taylor wrote that “the Establishment draws in recruits from outside as soon as they are ready to conform to its standards and become respectable. There is nothing more agreeable in life than to make peace with the Establishment — and nothing more corrupting”. It’s a typically pithy thought, and it…
Nicky Morgan was right when she questioned the government's plans for new grammar schools: “We no longer live in a world where we need only the top 20% or 30% to be highly skilled,” she said. “We need everybody to have access to a knowledge-rich, excellent academic curriculum.” It’s this point that should be at the heart of the education debate. Grammar schools were created with a vision of academic excellence for 25 per cent of children. Those children were…

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